5 More Great Signature Guitars Inspired and Designed by Female Guitarists

by Marisa Torrieri Bloom

From St. Vincent’s Ernie Ball Music Man guitar to Orianthi’s PRS, signature guitars by and for women are no longer an anomaly for the occasional, rogue female guitarist who shreds like she belongs in a headlining band. 

As a sequel to our first guide on female-inspired and designed guitars, we offer five more signature guitars from some of the best (female) musicians around.

Nita Strauss’ Ibanez JIVA10 Signature Electric Guitar. Unveiled in summer 2018 as Strauss embarked on another U.S. tour with Alice Cooper, this “deep space blonde” electric guitar is lightweight and ideal for the mobile rocker who likes to move around onstage. The guitar’s Edge Zero II bridge features a lower profile design for comfort, a stud lock function for superior tuning stability, signature DiMarzio pickups and more. Watch Strauss demo the guitar in this video. 

[RELATED: 5 Reasons Why I’m Swooning Over Guitarist Nita Strauss’ Signature Ibanez JIVA]

Courtney Cox Signature Caparison Guitars Horus-M3 CC. Like Strauss’ guitar, this baby — the first signature model for the Iron Maidens’ lead guitarist — is durable and made for a shredder. Features include a full 27-finger fretboard (for screaming solos), a custom-wound Caparison hum buckers, and maple center section so you can play high-pitched solos or warmer tones. 

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Courtney Cox Signature Caparison Guitars Horus-M3 CC

B.C. Rich Lita Ford Signature Warlock Electric Guitar. The wicked-looking 2012 guitar played by the mother of metal features an “onyx-colored beveled mahogany” body, mahogany neck, and ebony fretboard. We’re digging the “black widow” design on the lower bout. It also features two dual humbucker pickups: a Seymour Duncan SH-4 (neck) and a Seymour Duncan SH-6 (bridge). 

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B.C. Rich Lita Ford Signature Warlock Electric Guitar

Ovation Kaki King Signature Artist Elite Acoustic Electric Guitar. This guitar, a collaboration between King collaborated with the Ovation R&D team, is a high-performance instrument with single cutaway body with a AAA Solid Spruce top with quarter-swan scalloped “X” bracing. The satin-finished, five-piece mahogany/maple neck has an ebony fretboard with 20 fully accessible frets (but 24 frets on the high-E string). 

1996 Bonnie Raitt Signature Stratocaster. Blues rocker Raitt was one of the first women to get her own signature guitar from Fender. This baby — which is no longer in production — features a slim “C” shaped neck, clean tone and a gorgeous finish. 

Want to try one out? Be sure to call your local guitar or music store first (or check an online retailer’s return policy ). Happy jam time! 

Marisa Torrieri Bloom is the editor and founder of Rockmommy.

5 Heavy Metal Artists I Wish would Make a Children’s Record

by Marisa Torrieri Bloom

In 2016, I interviewed a ton of rock mamas who made children’s music — from big name rockers like Amy Lee of Evanescence and Priscilla Ahn to kid-music-genre mainstays like Laurie Berkner.

But I couldn’t help but wonder, as my kids and I jammed out to each of these ladies’ records, what would an Axl Rose children’s album sound like? Or one by Ozzy Osborne?

And so I arrive at this list: The five heavy metal artists whom I wish would make a children’s record:

1. Alice Cooper. The shock rocker and “Trash” talker in eyeliner (and dad) would definitely have my attention if he wrote an alternate version of “Poison” with lyrics that touched on the dangers of drinking tonics in the medicine cabinet (or breaking into Dad’s pillbox and downing his cholesterol medication).

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Rockmommy Lita Ford

2. Slash. The lead guitar virtuoso with the killer black hair would bring legions of toddlers to the Hair Metal Nation station if he recorded an electric-guitar version of “Itsy Bitsy Spider” and planted a face-melting spider-solo (whereupon his fingers crawled down the neck of the guitar) at the end of the song. No doubt his sons would be jamming out to this tune, too.

3. Lita Ford. The mother of metal (and two grown boys) shreds with the best of them, and sings with the best of them, too. Who wouldn’t love to hear “Kiss me Deadly” reimagined with PG-rated lyrics that 4-year-olds could enjoy? Let’s see … “I went to the play date last Saturday Night … didn’t get to play, got in a fight. Oh no! It ain’t no big thing!” 

4. Glenn Danzig. Deep down, Mr. D. is definitely a mama’s boy (I mean, c’mon, he has a song called “Mother,” right?). I’d love him to turn that “Mother” song into a kid-friendly version so 5th graders everywhere could sing, “mama? Do you wanna bang heads with me?” Or maybe he could try rewriting the lyrics to Lucifuge’s “Long way Back from Hell” so kids would hear his big voice atop a cool, dive-bomb guitar tune?

5. Sepultura. We need more gravelly death metal vocals in children’s music, because they pay homage to Cookie Monster. And they help children who aren’t aspiring to be Adele have more realistic goals (e.g., to sound like Cookie Monster). Brazilian heavy metal band Sepultura, who wrote one of my favorite records (Chaos A.D.) and has another tour coming up (how they’ve managed to survive with all those lineup changes is beyond me) is well positioned for this kind of project.

Did I miss any good ones? I’d love to hear any other ideas for a heavy metal children’s album, so please post in the comments and thoughts below.

— Marisa Torrieri Bloom is the editor and founder of Rockmommy.

Living Like a Runaway: On Meeting Lita Ford, Rock Mama and Metal Goddess

As I awaited the flesh-and-bones arrival of rock legend Lita Ford at the signing for her newly released memoir “Living Like a Runaway” in downtown Manhattan, I had no idea what to expect.

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Me and my friend Kendra at Lita Ford’s 2/23/16 book signing. I’m wearing my CBGB T-shirt signed by the Mother of Metal.

Sure, I knew I’d be among aging metal heads and middle-aged, black-clad dorks at a spacious and brightly lit Barnes & Noble. I also and that “Kiss Me Deadly,” her 1989 solo hit, would stream through the speakers at some point. But I didn’t know what kind of woman I’d encounter at showtime.

Would one of the baddest bad-ass women of rock and roll whose guitar shredding capabilities would put mine to shame roll her eyes at my surface-level experiences? Would the rocker mom with gnarly battle scars from the rough and sexist 1970s be approachable? Or, would the “mother of metal” possess a narcissistic demeanor instead of one of humble gratitude?

As I chatted away with one of the dudes sitting near me, Ford emerged from the back of the store in her skintight jeans and black stiletto booties, flanked by female journalist Jeanne Fury, who would engage in a Q&A with the singer. Immediately, I was taken in by her striking beauty. At 58, Ford— with her eyes lined in black and signature blonde hair that flowed behind her shoulders — is breathtaking. And as I would soon learn, she’s outspoken, intelligent, and pretty funny, too.

“It was just like I had this gift from God or something, that I was supposed to play heavy metal,” she told the small crowd after joking with the reporter that it was “first gig at Barnes & Noble.”

Like the new memoir, most of the talk focused on Ford’s rise stardom as the only female guitarist who could hang with the likes of Black Sabbath and would give Jimmy Page a run for his money (in the book she tells a funny story about meeting Robert Plant and being asked to play bass for Led Zeppelin).

She took the audience through her early years, when a-holes at bars would try to spill beer on her or guys from other bands would accuse her of swiping their guitar cables.

One of the best stories was her first memories of experiencing metal at her Black Sabbath show. “I wanted to make the audience feel what I felt at that show that night,” she said. “When I saw them, I thought, ‘that’s it.’ This is what I’m meant to do.”

Throughout Ford’s talk, it was hard to ignore the elephant in the room: The muddled circumstances of her divorce, and separation from her two young sons with whom she no longer has a relationship. It’s particularly heartbreaking to me, as I can’t imagine my tiny toddler boys shunning me in that way. It must be hell living with this aspect of reality, not being able to hold her sons as they grow into young men, or taking part in their day-to-day lives.

But if Ford is an angry woman who isn’t fit to be a mother, as her ex-husband has suggested,  I didn’t see it, nor did I sense it (and I have pretty good instinct). Instead, I witnessed a wizened lady enjoying her well-earned fame. Still, I told her I’d think “positive thoughts” and I did. Truly, I hope she gets to see her grown boys again, and experience their love.

Anyway, I’m so psyched to read the rest of this book!

When I got home from the NYC reading — and going home is a two-hour trek, mind you! — I found myself making more time to strum my chocolate-brown Gibson SG (which also happened to be the color and model of the first guitar she bought with her own money). I also felt younger, at heart. For all of the expectations imposed on older women, that we ought to dress in Chico’s once we hit 50, or develop a liking for Opera, I felt excited by the notion that older age doesn’t have to be boring or un-sexy. Cheers to Lita Ford for giving me that feeling!